What to Avoid and What to Confront in the Fight For Unity Part 3


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In Ephesians 4:1-6 the Apostle Paul declared biblically, apostolically and prophetically that the church is one,

I, therefore, the prisoner of the Lord, beseech you to walk worthy of the calling with which you were called, with all lowliness and gentleness, with longsuffering, bearing with one another in love, endeavoring to keep the unity of the Spirit in the bond of peace. There is one body and one Spirit, just as you were called in one hope of your calling; one Lord, one faith, one baptism; one God and Father of all, who is above all, and through all, and in you all. (NKJV)

      There are many local churches. We read in the New Testament that the church was separated by cities. We read that each local church was assigned Elders and Deacons. However, the church was and is one.

      The Moravian Church, one, if not the oldest Protestant Denomination, has it roots 100 years before Martin Luther’s protestation. A Philosophy Professor and rector of the University of Prague by the name of John Huss (1369-1415) was declaring then the things that Martin Luther declared 100 years later. John Huss was burned alive for his believes, however, his spirit remained alive and well.

“The reformation spirit did not die with Hus. The Moravian Church, or Unitas Fratrum (Unity of Brethren), as it has been officially known since 1457, arose as followers of Hus gathered in the village of Kunvald, about 100 miles east of Prague, in eastern Bohemia, and organized the church. This was 60 years before Martin Luther began his reformation and 100 years before the establishment of the Anglican Church. By 1467 the Moravian Church had established its own ministry, and in the years that followed three orders of the ministry were defined: deacon, presbyter and bishop.” (http://www.moravian.org/the-moravian-church/the-moravian-church/history.html)

      The religious history of the United States cannot be written without the central participation of this amazing group of brothers and sisters.

The Moravians first came to America during the colonial period. In 1735 they were part of General Oglethorpe’s philanthropic venture in Georgia. Their attempt to establish a community in Savannah did not succeed, but they did have a profound impact on the young John Wesley who had gone to Georgia during a personal spiritual crisis. Wesley was impressed that the Moravians remained calm during a storm that was panicking experienced sailors. He was amazed at people who did not fear death, and back in London he worshiped with Moravians in the Fetter Lane Chapel. There his “heart was strangely warmed.” (http://www.moravian.org/the-moravian-church/the-moravian-church/history.html)

         The Moravians lived by a very powerful way of thinking. The thunderous echo of their mission statement continues to penetrate the hearts of men and women of God today who know that these words are true,

“In Essentials, Unity; In Nonessentials, Liberty; In All Things, Love.”

http://www.moravian.org/the-moravian-church/the-moravian-church/history.html

       

TO BE CONTINUED…

 

 

What to Avoid and What to Confront in the Fight For Unity Part 2


unity_432x3281

 

I don’t think you have to be a prophet or a doctor in theology to realize that the Body of Christ is painfully divided. We should also quickly add that this issue of unity is not to be taken lightly. In John chapter 17 we see Jesus earnestly praying for us, as God’s children, to be one. The issue of unity in the Body of Christ is not a recommendation; it is indeed an obligation. Our disunity is a direct disrespect to God’s Word.

      Many people have spoken about the importance of unity in the church for hundreds of years. It seems like these voices are growing more and more fatigue. The unity of the Body of Christ looks like an impossible task to say the least.

      The church was united during the times of the Apostles, but that unity was challenged from the beginning with the introduction of false teachers, false prophets and false doctrines. As you read the Epistles of the Apostles you can clearly see that the fight for the unity of the Body was intense from the beginning.

      For the first three hundred years after Christ, the Church suffered a brutal persecution; but the church was growing and its power was clear. Things changed after Constantine declared Christianity, the official religion of the Roman Empire 312 years after Christ. This was the beginning of a very sophisticated plan of the enemy to seduce the church to mix in with the world.

      This takes me to another important note on these series, the Catholic Church. The Catholic Church claimed to be the one and only True Church. Catholic tradition makes the grandiose claim that the Apostle Peter was their first Pope. For historical reasons we can arguably see the official beginning of the Catholic church at the Council of Nicea and the Nicene Creed from 325 C.E. which states, “We believe in one, holy, catholic, and apostolic Church.”

      I can humbly say that the Catholic Church was the first man-made religion to present herself as the direct false representation of the Church of Christ on this earth. Their crimes against humanity are no secret, there Biblical atrocities and their own history is available for everybody to see and study if they care for the truth.

      This is not, however, a series about the history of the Catholic Church, but I must point out, as an amazing fact, that the Catholic Church has remained united even through many turbulent periods. They had divisions, some denominations that have come out of the Catholic Church are almost a photocopy of the way Catholics conduct their services. I am also aware that there is a strong element of the Charismatic Catholic Church. But, for the most part, still today, they enjoy great unity.

      Is the Catholic Church’s unity a sign that they are indeed the true church? Absolutely not. Martin Luther protest against the Catholic Church was as valid on October 31, 1517 as it is today. I do not recognize them as the mother church because Biblically they went astray and they are still astray today. The problem is that we, as Protestants, have also gone astray with our shameful divisions.

 

TO BE CONTINUED…

 

 

 

 

 

 

What to Avoid and What to Confront in the Fight For Unity


unity_432x3281

13 When Jesus came into the region of Caesarea Philippi, He asked His disciples, saying, “Who do men say that I, the Son of Man, am?”

14 So they said, “Some say John the Baptist, some Elijah, and others Jeremiah or one of the prophets.”

15 He said to them, “But who do you say that I am?”

16 Simon Peter answered and said, “You are the Christ, the Son of the living God.”

17 Jesus answered and said to him, “Blessed are you, Simon Bar-Jonah, for flesh and blood has not revealed this to you, but My Father who is in heaven. 18 And I also say to you that you are Peter, and on this rock I will build My church, and the gates of Hades shall not prevail against it. Matthew 16:13-18 (NKJV)

      These passages of Scripture give us the initial words used to describe the story of the Church. The true church can be found on the proper, sincere and heartfelt answer to Jesus’ one question,  “Who do men say that I, the Son of Man, am?” John 16:13 (NKJV)

      The foundation of the church is not based on us answering this question in any kind of selfish and unaccountable way.  This was not a question impossible to be answered; it was not a trick question. In Matthew 16:14 they answered the wrong way by saying,

“Some say John the Baptist, some Elijah, and others Jeremiah or one of the prophets.” (NKJV)

      What does John the Baptist, Elijah, Jeremiah and the rest of the prophets had in common? They were all men. They were Godly men, powerful Biblical personalities; nevertheless, they were just like you and me, mere men.

      Neither John the Baptist, Elijah, Jeremiah and the rest of the prophets claimed to be the Jesus or intended to start a movement; they were indeed, Godly men. However, we have seen through the history of the church, that charismatic men have come up with their own ideas of who Jesus is. They have also taken Jesus and the Word out of the center and positioned themselves and their own constitutions and bylaws in place of it. Peter, on the other hand, answer Jesus’ question correctly,

“You are the Christ, the Son of the living God.” Matthew 16:16 (NKJV)

      Peter clearly established who the Christ or Anointed One is and His relationship as Son of the Living God. That seemingly simple revelation is the foundation of what we call the church. To this revelation Jesus answered,

17 Jesus answered and said to him, “Blessed are you, Simon Bar-Jonah, for flesh and blood has not revealed this to you, but My Father who is in heaven. 18 And I also say to you that you are Peter, and on this rock I will build My church, and the gates of Hades shall not prevail against it. Matthew 16:17-18 (NKJV)

      On these two verses we can see that the church is blessed by God, that revelation comes from God and that the church can’t be overcome by the devil, by the world or by whatever hell throw at it. An appropriate question to ask at this point is… Where is that church today?

 

TO BE CONTINUED…

 

The Young and…The Old


old-look-young-hollywood-actor

When we are young we either think we know it all or we just find it cool to be clueless. Wasting time when we are young becomes a daily routine we learn, not only to embrace, but to look forward to it. As we grow older we realize how much we don’t know as a fresh revelation. In our hunger for knowledge we now realize that our brains are also older and they don’t capture and retain information, as they should when we wasted our days. The old also realize that he is running out of time. Now reading is what we look forward to it. Oh but how special is he who make these realizations early in life!

¿Quién Fue Jesús?


¿Quién fue Jesús? Alguien que cambió los tiempos. Un hombre no carismático, uno que no fue conocido por su atractivo físico, mas por la profundidad de su amor.

 

       Un hombre que amó en esta tierra como nadie nunca ha amado. Un hombre que caminó con una pasión y con una compasión incomparable. Un hombre que se hizo visible al mundo por treinta y tres años. Un hombre del cual nunca salió palabra injusta. Un hombre que nunca cometió pecado de mente ni de acción. Nadie vestido de carne y hueso jamás a ha podido alcanzar semejante perfección.

 

       El propósito de Jesús fue siempre puro. Ayudó a tantos, bendijo a miles, mas fue grandemente traicionado. Isaías contó su historia proféticamente y fue testigo de Su dolor cientos de años antes de los tiempos de la cruz. Dios abrió la puerta de revelación e Isaías dibujó la historia del dolor de Cristo de la siguiente manera,

 

53 ¿QUIÉN ha creído á nuestro anuncio? ¿y sobre quién se ha manifestado el brazo de Jehová?

Y subirá cual renuevo delante de él, y como raíz de tierra seca: no hay parecer en él, ni hermosura: verlo hemos, mas sin atractivo para que le deseemos.

Despreciado y desechado entre los hombres, varón de dolores, experimentado en quebranto: y como que escondimos de él el rostro, fué menospreciado, y no lo estimamos.

Ciertamente llevó él nuestras enfermedades, y sufrió nuestros dolores; y nosotros le tuvimos por azotado, por herido de Dios y abatido.

Mas él herido fué por nuestras rebeliones, molido por nuestros pecados: el castigo de nuestra paz sobre él; y por su llaga fuimos nosotros curados.

Todos nosotros nos descarriamos como ovejas, cada cual se apartó por su camino: mas Jehová cargó en él el pecado de todos nosotros.

Angustiado él, y afligido, no abrió su boca: como cordero fué llevado al matadero; y como oveja delante de sus trasquiladores, enmudeció, y no abrió su boca.

De la cárcel y del juicio fué quitado; y su generación ¿quién la contará? Porque cortado fué de la tierra de los vivientes; por la rebelión de mi pueblo fué herido.

Y dipúsose con los impíos su sepultura, mas con los ricos fué en su muerte; porque nunca hizo él maldad, ni hubo engaño en su boca.

10 Con todo eso Jehová quiso quebrantarlo, sujetándole á padecimiento. Cuando hubiere puesto su vida en expiación por el pecado, verá linaje, vivirá por largos días, y la voluntad de Jehová será en su mano prosperada.

11 Del trabajo de su alma verá y será saciado; con su conocimiento justificará mi siervo justo á muchos, y él llevará las iniquidades de ellos.

12 Por tanto yo le daré parte con los grandes, y con los fuertes repartirá despojos; por cuanto derramó su vida hasta la muerte, y fué contado con los perversos, habiendo él llevado el pecado de muchos y orado por los transgresores.

Isaías 53

Reina-Valera Antigua (RVA)

 

       Oh gracias Jesús por tu santo sacrificio, por tu inolvidable amor, por tu poder, por tu misericordia, por tu fidelidad y por salvar mi alma. Hoy eres mi Salvador, mi Señor, mas también mi mejor amigo.

Ríndete


sufrido

¿Por qué sigues argumentando con Dios? ¿Por qué insistes que todo está bien con tu alma? ¿Tienes paz? ¿Tienes gozo? ¿Oh necesitas esa cerveza para poder reírte a carcajadas? Brincas de relación a relación, de novia a novia. Hoy estás con este, mañana estás con este otro. ¿Hasta cuando querido hijo? ¿Hasta cuando mi niña?

Pero voy a hacer honesto contigo, Dios te ama y está listo para recibirte tal y como eres, mas entiende esto. Dios demanda que te entregues a El completamente y no ha medias. Tienes que arrepentirte de tus pecados y reconocer a su Hijo como único Salvador. Solo Cristo es el camino, la verdad y la vida.

Amado hijo, amada hija, tienes que reconocer que estás mal, que el problema eres tú y el pecado que te está matando día a día. Te invito, no ha que seas Catótico, Pentecostal, Presbiteriano, Metodista, etc. te invito a que seas Cristiano, te invito a que seas hijo o hija de Dios y a que seas parte de la familia de Cristo.

La realidad del Evangelio está siendo constantemente atacada, todo el mundo parece tener las respuestas, más las verdaderas respuestas están en la Biblia. El centro del mensaje del Juan el Bautista y de Jesús era este, ¡Arrepiéntete! Romanos 10:9-10 nos da las respuesta a tu problema y al mío. La Biblia nos dice que si confiesas con tu boca que Cristo es el Señor y lo crees en tu corazón serás salvo.

Tú puedes seguir viviendo tu vida a tu manera. Tienes el derecho a hacerlo. Puedes seguir creyendo las mentiras del mundo. Puedes seguir engañándote a ti mismo, pero tú sabes del vacío que tienes en el corazón, tu sabes que no tienes paz y tú sabes que sin esa cerveza no tienes gozo. Tú sabes que después que se fue tu borrachera, después que se te pasó la jumeta, después que terminaste de eyacularte, después que se acabó el fiestón y el efecto del Bacardí, o la Tequila o el Don Q, no encuentras paz y no encuentras gozo.

Es cuestión de tiempo antes de que tu novia te abandone por otro; es cuestión de tiempo y tu novio se irá, tan pronto como sepa que estás esperando un hijo suyo.

Hoy te suplico… Ríndete a Cristo. El te ama como nadie nunca te amará, El es fiel, y nunca te abandonará. Deja de estar tratando de vivir esta vida solo o sola…Ven a Cristo, ven a la vida, ven a la verdad y verás tu vida transformada.

Si no sabes que hacer escríbeme a angelcasiano@aol.com

Aquí estoy para servirte y para ayudarte. Lo hago de corazón y lo hago gratuitamente. Que Dios te bendiga,

Con cariño, amor y sinceridad,

Hermano Angel Casiano

Poll: Is America ready to go without Affirmative Action?


To all of my followers and to anybody that comes in contact with this blog, would you be so kind to answer this question? Is America ready to go without Affirmative Action?

What is affirmative Action? A policy or a program that seeks to redress past discrimination through active measures to ensure equal opportunity, as in education and employment.

Your comments are also welcome!

The 10 Worst Fiscal Year Deficits Since 1940 to 2013


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The 10 Worst Fiscal Year Deficits Since 1940 to 2013
       
Year President Party Deficit Amount
2009 Obama Democrat  1,413 Billions 
2011 Obama Democrat  1,299 Billions 
2010 Obama Democrat  1,294 Billions 
2012 Obama Democrat  1,100 Billions 
2013 Obama Democrat  759 Billions 
2004 Bush Republican  413 Billion 
2003 Bush Repubican  377 Billion 
2005 Bush Republican  318 Billion 
2006 Bush Republican  248 Billion 
       
Clinton turned over the Presidency to Bush with a 236.4 
billion dollars surplus. Bush turned over the Presidency
to Obama with a 459 billion dollars deficit. These are the 
numbers that count.      
       

A History of Surpluses and Deficits in the United States by Dave Manuel


inShare22

On this page you will find a history of surpluses and deficits in the United States, running all the way back until 1789.

Directly underneath you will find an up-to-date table that contains all of the budget surpluses and deficits in the United States from 1940 until present day, both in nominal dollars and inflation adjusted dollars. A projection for 2013 is included as well:

Deficits/Surpluses From 1940 Until 2013 (*fiscal years)

1* – Presidential control
2* – Senate control
3* – House control

D = Democrat R = Republican

Year Nominal Dollars Inflation Adjusted 1* 2* 3*

1940 $2.9 Billion Deficit $48.33 Billion Deficit D D D

1941 $4.9 Billion Deficit $77.78 Billion Deficit D D D

1942 $20.5 Billion Deficit $292.86 Billion Deficit D D D

1943 $54.6 Billion Deficit $737.84 Billion Deficit D D D

1944 $47.6 Billion Deficit $634.67 Billion Deficit D D D

1945 $47.6 Billion Deficit $618.18 Billion Deficit D D D

1946 $15.9 Billion Deficit $191.57 Billion Deficit D D D

1947 $4 Billion Surplus $42.11 Billion Surplus D R R

1948 $11.8 Billion Surplus $114.56 Billion Surplus D R R

1949 $0.6 Billion Surplus $5.88 Billion Surplus D D D

1950 $3.1 Billion Deficit $30.1 Billion Deficit D D D

1951 $6.1 Billion Surplus $54.95 Billion Surplus D D D

1952 $1.5 Billion Deficit $13.27 Billion Deficit D D D

1953 $6.5 Billion Deficit $57.02 Billion Deficit R R D

1954 $1.2 Billion Deficit $10.43 Billion Deficit R R D

1955 $3 Billion Deficit $26.09 Billion Deficit R D D

1956 $3.9 Billion Surplus $33.62 Billion Surplus R D D

1957 $3.4 Billion Surplus $28.33 Billion Surplus R D D

1958 $2.8 Billion Deficit $22.58 Billion Deficit R D D

1959 $12.8 Billion Deficit $103.23 Billion Deficit R D D

1960 $0.3 Billion Surplus $2.36 Billion Surplus R D D

1961 $3.3 Billion Deficit $25.78 Billion Deficit D D D

1962 $7.1 Billion Deficit $55.04 Billion Deficit D D D

1963 $4.8 Billion Deficit $36.64 Billion Deficit D D D

1964 $5.9 Billion Deficit $44.36 Billion Deficit D D D

1965 $1.4 Billion Deficit $10.37 Billion Deficit D D D

1966 $3.7 Billion Deficit $26.62 Billion Deficit D D D

1967 $8.6 Billion Deficit $60.14 Billion Deficit D D D

1968 $25.2 Billion Deficit $169.13 Billion Deficit D D D

1969 $3.2 Billion Surplus $20.38 Billion Surplus R D D

1970 $2.8 Billion Deficit $16.87 Billion Deficit R D D

1971 $23 Billion Deficit $132.95 Billion Deficit R D D

1972 $23.4 Billion Deficit $130.73 Billion Deficit R D D

1973 $14.9 Billion Deficit $78.42 Billion Deficit R D D

1974 $6.1 Billion Deficit $28.91 Billion Deficit R D D

1975 $53.2 Billion Deficit $231.3 Billion Deficit R D D

1976 $73.7 Billion Deficit $303.29 Billion Deficit R D D

1977 $53.7 Billion Deficit $207.34 Billion Deficit D D D

1978 $59.2 Billion Deficit $212.19 Billion Deficit D D D

1979 $40.7 Billion Deficit $130.87 Billion Deficit D D D

1980 $73.8 Billion Deficit $209.66 Billion Deficit D D D

1981 $79 Billion Deficit $203.08 Billion Deficit R R D

1982 $128 Billion Deficit $309.93 Billion Deficit R R D

1983 $207.8 Billion Deficit $487.79 Billion Deficit R R D

1984 $185.4 Billion Deficit $417.57 Billion Deficit R R D

1985 $212.3 Billion Deficit $461.52 Billion Deficit R R D

1986 $221.2 Billion Deficit $471.64 Billion Deficit R R D

1987 $149.7 Billion Deficit $308.02 Billion Deficit R D D

1988 $155.2 Billion Deficit $306.72 Billion Deficit R D D

1989 $152.5 Billion Deficit $287.74 Billion Deficit R D D

1990 $221.2 Billion Deficit $395.71 Billion Deficit R D D

1991 $269.3 Billion Deficit $461.92 Billion Deficit R D D

1992 $290.4 Billion Deficit $484 Billion Deficit R D D

1993 $255.1 Billion Deficit $412.78 Billion Deficit D D D

1994 $203.2 Billion Deficit $320.5 Billion Deficit D D D

1995 $164 Billion Deficit $251.53 Billion Deficit D R R

1996 $107.5 Billion Deficit $160.21 Billion Deficit D R R

1997 $22 Billion Deficit $32.07 Billion Deficit D R R

1998 $69.2 Billion Surplus $99.28 Billion Surplus D R R

1999 $125.6 Billion Surplus $176.16 Billion Surplus D R R

2000 $236.4 Billion Surplus $320.76 Billion Surplus D R R

2001 $127.3 Billion Surplus $168.16 Billion Surplus R D R

2002 $157.8 Billion Deficit $205.2 Billion Deficit R D R

2003 $377.6 Billion Deficit $479.8 Billion Deficit R R R

2004 $413 Billion Deficit $511.14 Billion Deficit R R R

2005 $318 Billion Deficit $380.84 Billion Deficit R R R

2006 $248 Billion Deficit $287.7 Billion Deficit R R R

2007 $161 Billion Deficit $181.51 Billion Deficit R D D

2008 $459 Billion Deficit $498.37 Billion Deficit R D D

2009 $1413 Billion Deficit $1539.22 Billion Deficit D D D

2010 $1294 Billion Deficit $1386.92 Billion Deficit D D D

2011 $1299 Billion Deficit $1350.31 Billion Deficit D D R

2012 $1100 Billion Deficit $1120.16 Billion Deficit D D R

2013 $759 Billion Deficit $759 Billion Deficit D D R

Source: Whitehouse.gov – Historical Tables (Table 1.1)



Click Here for a Larger Image

Monthly Deficits, October 1980 – Present Day

Date Total Receipts Total Outlays Surplus/Deficit

October 1980 $38.92 B $55.84 B $-16.92 B
November 1980 $39.17 B $48.08 B $-8.91 B
December 1980 $48.9 B $50.87 B $-1.97 B
January 1981 $51.15 B $63.34 B $-12.19 B
February 1981 $38.13 B $53.75 B $-15.62 B
March 1981 $44.36 B $53.94 B $-9.58 B
April 1981 $74.19 B $57 B $17.19 B
May 1981 $38.24 B $54.41 B $-16.17 B
June 1981 $70.43 B $55.07 B $15.36 B
July 1981 $47.83 B $58.17 B $-10.34 B
August 1981 $47.67 B $52.79 B $-5.12 B
September 1981 $60.28 B $53.94 B $6.34 B
October 1981 $45.47 B $63.57 B $-18.11 B
November 1981 $44.32 B $54.96 B $-10.64 B
December 1981 $57.41 B $76.88 B $-19.47 B
January 1982 $55.27 B $45.93 B $9.34 B
February 1982 $43.04 B $57.82 B $-14.78 B
March 1982 $45.29 B $63.55 B $-18.26 B
April 1982 $75.78 B $66.07 B $9.7 B
May 1982 $36.75 B $55.68 B $-18.93 B
June 1982 $66.35 B $59.63 B $6.72 B
July 1982 $44.68 B $64.51 B $-19.83 B
August 1982 $44.92 B $59.63 B $-14.7 B
September 1982 $59.69 B $61.4 B $-1.71 B
October 1982 $40.54 B $66.71 B $-26.17 B
November 1982 $42.01 B $66.17 B $-24.16 B
December 1982 $54.5 B $72.44 B $-17.94 B
January 1983 $57.51 B $67.09 B $-9.58 B
February 1983 $38.82 B $64.15 B $-25.34 B
March 1983 $43.5 B $69.54 B $-26.04 B
April 1983 $66.23 B $69.54 B $-3.31 B
May 1983 $33.76 B $63.04 B $-29.29 B
June 1983 $66.52 B $63.12 B $3.4 B
July 1983 $43.95 B $65.36 B $-21.41 B
August 1983 $49.68 B $67.16 B $-17.48 B
September 1983 $63.56 B $61.61 B $1.95 B
October 1983 $45.16 B $70.23 B $-25.07 B
November 1983 $46.2 B $67.79 B $-21.59 B
December 1983 $58.04 B $74.71 B $-16.66 B
January 1984 $62.54 B $68.05 B $-5.52 B
February 1984 $47.89 B $68.27 B $-20.38 B
March 1984 $44.46 B $73.02 B $-28.56 B
April 1984 $80.18 B $68.69 B $11.49 B
May 1984 $37.46 B $71.39 B $-33.93 B
June 1984 $69.28 B $71.28 B $-2 B
July 1984 $52.02 B $68.43 B $-16.42 B
August 1984 $55.21 B $88.71 B $-33.5 B
September 1984 $68.02 B $51.23 B $16.79 B
October 1984 $52.25 B $80.26 B $-28.01 B
November 1984 $51.49 B $80.39 B $-28.9 B
December 1984 $62.4 B $76.97 B $-14.57 B
January 1985 $70.45 B $78.45 B $-7.99 B
February 1985 $54.05 B $75.1 B $-21.05 B
March 1985 $49.61 B $79.11 B $-29.5 B
April 1985 $94.6 B $83.21 B $11.39 B
May 1985 $39.79 B $81.79 B $-42 B
June 1985 $72.15 B $73.56 B $-1.41 B
July 1985 $57.65 B $79.18 B $-21.53 B
August 1985 $55.78 B $83.38 B $-27.6 B
September 1985 $73.81 B $74.58 B $-0.76 B
October 1985 $57.89 B $84.97 B $-27.09 B
November 1985 $51.17 B $84.55 B $-33.39 B
December 1985 $68.2 B $82.85 B $-14.66 B
January 1986 $76.7 B $83.19 B $-6.49 B
February 1986 $53.37 B $77.95 B $-24.58 B
March 1986 $49.56 B $79.7 B $-30.14 B
April 1986 $91.44 B $81.51 B $9.93 B
May 1986 $46.25 B $85.64 B $-39.4 B
June 1986 $77.02 B $78.07 B $-1.04 B
July 1986 $62.97 B $85.28 B $-22.3 B
August 1986 $56.52 B $84.58 B $-28.06 B
September 1986 $78.01 B $81.94 B $-3.93 B
October 1986 $59.01 B $84.3 B $-25.29 B
November 1986 $52.97 B $80.05 B $-27.09 B
December 1986 $78.04 B $90.4 B $-12.37 B
January 1987 $81.77 B $83.93 B $-2.16 B
February 1987 $55.46 B $83.84 B $-28.38 B
March 1987 $56.52 B $84.45 B $-27.93 B
April 1987 $122.9 B $84.16 B $38.74 B
May 1987 $47.69 B $83.33 B $-35.64 B
June 1987 $82.95 B $83.57 B $-0.62 B
July 1987 $64.22 B $86.56 B $-22.34 B
August 1987 $60.21 B $82.01 B $-21.8 B
September 1987 $92.41 B $77.21 B $15.2 B
October 1987 $62.3 B $93.11 B $-30.81 B
November 1987 $56.92 B $83.94 B $-27.02 B
December 1987 $85.47 B $109.83 B $-24.36 B
January 1988 $81.74 B $65.84 B $15.9 B
February 1988 $60.28 B $84.34 B $-24.07 B
March 1988 $65.66 B $94.95 B $-29.28 B
April 1988 $109.27 B $95.5 B $13.77 B
May 1988 $59.64 B $82.22 B $-22.58 B
June 1988 $99.14 B $90.01 B $9.13 B
July 1988 $60.63 B $83.55 B $-22.92 B
August 1988 $69.39 B $92.47 B $-23.08 B
September 1988 $97.74 B $87.57 B $10.17 B
October 1988 $63.58 B $90.59 B $-27.01 B
November 1988 $64.33 B $93.47 B $-29.14 B
December 1988 $93.66 B $106.45 B $-12.79 B
January 1989 $89.31 B $86.51 B $2.8 B
February 1989 $61.9 B $89.77 B $-27.87 B
March 1989 $68.21 B $103.99 B $-35.78 B
April 1989 $128.89 B $88.24 B $40.65 B
May 1989 $71.03 B $96.46 B $-25.43 B
June 1989 $108.25 B $100.46 B $7.79 B
July 1989 $66.19 B $84.43 B $-18.24 B
August 1989 $76.14 B $98.29 B $-22.15 B
September 1989 $99.23 B $105.38 B $-6.15 B
October 1989 $68.42 B $94.5 B $-26.08 B
November 1989 $71.17 B $100.91 B $-29.73 B
December 1989 $89.12 B $103.89 B $-14.77 B
January 1990 $99.52 B $91.24 B $8.28 B
February 1990 $65.14 B $100.35 B $-35.21 B
March 1990 $64.81 B $118.13 B $-53.32 B
April 1990 $139.6 B $97.78 B $41.83 B
May 1990 $69.19 B $111.67 B $-42.48 B
June 1990 $110.6 B $121.71 B $-11.11 B
July 1990 $72.33 B $98.25 B $-25.92 B
August 1990 $78.46 B $131.18 B $-52.72 B
September 1990 $102.94 B $82.17 B $20.77 B
October 1990 $76.99 B $108.35 B $-31.36 B
November 1990 $70.51 B $118.23 B $-47.72 B
December 1990 $101.9 B $109.29 B $-7.39 B
January 1991 $100.71 B $99.06 B $1.65 B
February 1991 $67.66 B $93.85 B $-26.19 B
March 1991 $64.81 B $105.98 B $-41.17 B
April 1991 $140.38 B $110.37 B $30.01 B
May 1991 $63.56 B $116.93 B $-53.37 B
June 1991 $103.39 B $105.97 B $-2.58 B
July 1991 $78.59 B $119.42 B $-40.83 B
August 1991 $76.43 B $120.08 B $-43.65 B
September 1991 $109.35 B $116.24 B $-6.89 B
October 1991 $78.07 B $114.66 B $-36.59 B
November 1991 $73.1 B $117.78 B $-44.68 B
December 1991 $103.64 B $106.17 B $-2.53 B
January 1992 $104.03 B $119.7 B $-15.67 B
February 1992 $62.75 B $111.93 B $-49.18 B
March 1992 $72.13 B $122.84 B $-50.71 B
April 1992 $138.35 B $123.75 B $14.6 B
May 1992 $62.18 B $108.96 B $-46.77 B
June 1992 $120.88 B $117.1 B $3.78 B
July 1992 $79.05 B $122.2 B $-43.15 B
August 1992 $78.1 B $102.84 B $-24.74 B
September 1992 $118.19 B $112.88 B $5.31 B
October 1992 $76.83 B $125.62 B $-48.79 B
November 1992 $74.63 B $107.36 B $-32.73 B
December 1992 $113.69 B $152.63 B $-38.95 B
January 1993 $112.72 B $82.9 B $29.82 B
February 1993 $65.98 B $114.48 B $-48.5 B
March 1993 $83.29 B $127.26 B $-43.97 B
April 1993 $132.02 B $124.2 B $7.82 B
May 1993 $70.64 B $107.61 B $-36.96 B
June 1993 $128.57 B $117.47 B $11.1 B
July 1993 $80.63 B $120.21 B $-39.58 B
August 1993 $86.74 B $109.82 B $-23.08 B
September 1993 $127.5 B $118.99 B $8.52 B
October 1993 $78.66 B $124.09 B $-45.42 B
November 1993 $83.1 B $121.48 B $-38.38 B
December 1993 $125.4 B $133.11 B $-7.71 B
January 1994 $122.96 B $107.71 B $15.25 B
February 1994 $73.19 B $114.75 B $-41.57 B
March 1994 $93.11 B $125.42 B $-32.32 B
April 1994 $141.32 B $123.87 B $17.45 B
May 1994 $83.54 B $115.6 B $-32.06 B
June 1994 $138.12 B $123.27 B $14.85 B
July 1994 $84.82 B $118.02 B $-33.2 B
August 1994 $97.33 B $121.61 B $-24.28 B
September 1994 $135.89 B $131.63 B $4.27 B
October 1994 $89.1 B $120.44 B $-31.34 B
November 1994 $87.75 B $124.99 B $-37.24 B
December 1994 $130.89 B $135.69 B $-4.8 B
January 1995 $131.88 B $116.24 B $15.63 B
February 1995 $82.62 B $120.98 B $-38.36 B
March 1995 $92.61 B $143.15 B $-50.54 B
April 1995 $165.47 B $115.75 B $49.72 B
May 1995 $90.48 B $130.04 B $-39.56 B
June 1995 $147.95 B $135.13 B $12.81 B
July 1995 $92.82 B $106.41 B $-13.58 B
August 1995 $96.64 B $130.49 B $-33.85 B
September 1995 $143.3 B $136.11 B $7.19 B
October 1995 $95.59 B $118.35 B $-22.76 B
November 1995 $90.09 B $128.54 B $-38.45 B
December 1995 $138.35 B $133.06 B $5.28 B
January 1996 $143 B $123.54 B $19.46 B
February 1996 $89.43 B $133.78 B $-44.35 B
March 1996 $89.09 B $136.16 B $-47.07 B
April 1996 $203.47 B $131.06 B $72.4 B
May 1996 $90.12 B $143.17 B $-53.05 B
June 1996 $152 B $117.66 B $34.34 B
July 1996 $103.89 B $130.75 B $-26.86 B
August 1996 $100 B $141.83 B $-41.83 B
September 1996 $157.67 B $122.41 B $35.26 B
October 1996 $99.66 B $139.46 B $-39.81 B
November 1996 $97.85 B $135.73 B $-37.88 B
December 1996 $148.49 B $130 B $18.49 B
January 1997 $150.72 B $137.35 B $13.36 B
February 1997 $90.29 B $134.3 B $-44.01 B
March 1997 $108.07 B $129.4 B $-21.32 B
April 1997 $228.59 B $134.65 B $93.94 B
May 1997 $94.49 B $142.99 B $-48.49 B
June 1997 $173.36 B $118.73 B $54.64 B
July 1997 $109.18 B $134.8 B $-25.62 B
August 1997 $103.48 B $138.67 B $-35.19 B
September 1997 $174.77 B $124.83 B $49.94 B
October 1997 $114.9 B $150.87 B $-35.97 B
November 1997 $103.48 B $120.83 B $-17.35 B
December 1997 $168 B $154.36 B $13.64 B
January 1998 $162.61 B $137.23 B $25.38 B
February 1998 $97.95 B $139.7 B $-41.75 B
March 1998 $117.93 B $131.74 B $-13.81 B
April 1998 $261 B $136.4 B $124.6 B
May 1998 $95.28 B $134.06 B $-38.78 B
June 1998 $187.86 B $136.75 B $51.11 B
July 1998 $119.72 B $143.81 B $-24.08 B
August 1998 $111.74 B $122.91 B $-11.17 B
September 1998 $181 B $143.57 B $37.42 B
October 1998 $119.97 B $152.41 B $-32.44 B
November 1998 $113.98 B $130.92 B $-16.94 B
December 1998 $178.65 B $183.8 B $-5.16 B
January 1999 $171.73 B $101.22 B $70.51 B
February 1999 $99.5 B $141.84 B $-42.34 B
March 1999 $130.42 B $152.82 B $-22.41 B
April 1999 $266.23 B $152.77 B $113.46 B
May 1999 $98.66 B $122.63 B $-23.97 B
June 1999 $199.51 B $145.94 B $53.57 B
July 1999 $121.92 B $147.09 B $-25.16 B
August 1999 $126.32 B $129.13 B $-2.8 B
September 1999 $200.41 B $142.37 B $58.04 B
October 1999 $121.04 B $147.36 B $-26.33 B
November 1999 $121.38 B $148.41 B $-27.03 B
December 1999 $201.2 B $168.11 B $33.08 B
January 2000 $189.48 B $127.33 B $62.15 B
February 2000 $108.68 B $150.41 B $-41.73 B
March 2000 $135.58 B $170.96 B $-35.38 B
April 2000 $295.15 B $135.65 B $159.5 B
May 2000 $146 B $149.61 B $-3.61 B
June 2000 $214.88 B $158.99 B $55.89 B
July 2000 $134.07 B $129.01 B $5.06 B
August 2000 $138.13 B $148.56 B $-10.43 B
September 2000 $219.49 B $153.74 B $65.75 B
October 2000 $135.84 B $147.16 B $-11.32 B
November 2000 $125.67 B $149.36 B $-23.69 B
December 2000 $200.49 B $167.82 B $32.67 B
January 2001 $219.22 B $142.84 B $76.38 B
February 2001 $110.48 B $158.65 B $-48.17 B
March 2001 $130.07 B $180.74 B $-50.66 B
April 2001 $331.8 B $142 B $189.8 B
May 2001 $125.59 B $153.51 B $-27.92 B
June 2001 $202.89 B $171.03 B $31.86 B
July 2001 $127.84 B $125.02 B $2.82 B
August 2001 $122.56 B $202.55 B $-79.99 B
September 2001 $158.61 B $123.11 B $35.5 B
October 2001 $157.16 B $164.82 B $-7.66 B
November 2001 $121.23 B $175.5 B $-54.27 B
December 2001 $187.91 B $161.35 B $26.57 B
January 2002 $203.45 B $159.72 B $43.73 B
February 2002 $97.96 B $174.02 B $-76.06 B
March 2002 $111.22 B $175.46 B $-64.24 B
April 2002 $237.43 B $170.26 B $67.17 B
May 2002 $102.5 B $183.13 B $-80.63 B
June 2002 $182.63 B $153.56 B $29.07 B
July 2002 $134.41 B $163.57 B $-29.16 B
August 2002 $124.62 B $179.33 B $-54.71 B
September 2002 $192.7 B $150.31 B $42.39 B
October 2002 $124.54 B $178.62 B $-54.07 B
November 2002 $120.02 B $178.9 B $-58.88 B
December 2002 $182.79 B $178.07 B $4.72 B
January 2003 $187.88 B $177.25 B $10.63 B
February 2003 $89.48 B $186.14 B $-96.66 B
March 2003 $120.36 B $179.23 B $-58.88 B
April 2003 $231.16 B $180.09 B $51.07 B
May 2003 $103.41 B $192.28 B $-88.87 B
June 2003 $193.04 B $171.81 B $21.23 B
July 2003 $123.55 B $177.79 B $-54.24 B
August 2003 $114.24 B $190.83 B $-76.59 B
September 2003 $191.63 B $168.23 B $23.4 B
October 2003 $135.82 B $205.37 B $-69.55 B
November 2003 $118.21 B $161.18 B $-42.97 B
December 2003 $186.73 B $204.37 B $-17.64 B
January 2004 $185.17 B $186.8 B $-1.63 B
February 2004 $92.01 B $188.71 B $-96.7 B
March 2004 $132.43 B $205.34 B $-72.91 B
April 2004 $220.09 B $202.51 B $17.58 B
May 2004 $115.45 B $177.91 B $-62.46 B
June 2004 $214.38 B $195.26 B $19.12 B
July 2004 $134.42 B $203.58 B $-69.16 B
August 2004 $137.73 B $178.86 B $-41.13 B
September 2004 $207.35 B $182.74 B $24.61 B
October 2004 $136.9 B $193.51 B $-56.62 B
November 2004 $134.55 B $191.72 B $-57.17 B
December 2004 $215.75 B $218.31 B $-2.56 B
January 2005 $202.22 B $194.11 B $8.11 B
February 2005 $100.87 B $214.66 B $-113.79 B
March 2005 $148.76 B $220.48 B $-71.72 B
April 2005 $277.61 B $219.69 B $57.92 B
May 2005 $152.73 B $188.92 B $-36.19 B
June 2005 $234.81 B $212.34 B $22.47 B
July 2005 $142.09 B $195.49 B $-53.4 B
August 2005 $155.44 B $206.47 B $-51.04 B
September 2005 $251.63 B $216.39 B $35.23 B
October 2005 $149.49 B $196.76 B $-47.28 B
November 2005 $138.84 B $221.91 B $-83.07 B
December 2005 $241.88 B $230.92 B $10.97 B
January 2006 $230.01 B $209.05 B $20.96 B
February 2006 $112.85 B $232.09 B $-119.24 B
March 2006 $164.56 B $249.84 B $-85.28 B
April 2006 $315.09 B $196.25 B $118.84 B
May 2006 $192.66 B $235.56 B $-42.91 B
June 2006 $264.36 B $243.84 B $20.52 B
July 2006 $159.76 B $192.93 B $-33.16 B
August 2006 $153.88 B $218.6 B $-64.72 B
September 2006 $283.3 B $227.13 B $56.17 B
October 2006 $167.69 B $217.01 B $-49.32 B
November 2006 $145.87 B $218.91 B $-73.04 B
December 2006 $259.97 B $218.01 B $41.96 B
January 2007 $260.61 B $222.37 B $38.24 B
February 2007 $120.31 B $240.31 B $-119.99 B
March 2007 $166.49 B $262.76 B $-96.27 B
April 2007 $383.64 B $205.97 B $177.67 B
May 2007 $164.24 B $231.94 B $-67.7 B
June 2007 $276.52 B $249.04 B $27.48 B
July 2007 $170.44 B $206.89 B $-36.45 B
August 2007 $166.55 B $283.52 B $-116.97 B
September 2007 $285.35 B $172.49 B $112.87 B
October 2007 $178.18 B $235.01 B $-56.84 B
November 2007 $151.06 B $249.29 B $-98.24 B
December 2007 $276.98 B $228.72 B $48.26 B
January 2008 $255.22 B $237.38 B $17.84 B
February 2008 $105.72 B $281.29 B $-175.56 B
March 2008 $178.82 B $227.03 B $-48.21 B
April 2008 $403.75 B $244.47 B $159.28 B
May 2008 $124.27 B $290.2 B $-165.93 B
June 2008 $259.91 B $226.37 B $33.55 B
July 2008 $160.49 B $263.26 B $-102.77 B
August 2008 $157.02 B $268.93 B $-111.91 B
September 2008 $272.23 B $226.49 B $45.73 B
October 2008 $164.83 B $320.36 B $-155.53 B
November 2008 $144.77 B $269.97 B $-125.2 B
December 2008 $237.79 B $289.54 B $-51.75 B
January 2009 $226.09 B $289.55 B $-63.46 B
February 2009 $87.31 B $281.17 B $-193.86 B
March 2009 $128.93 B $320.51 B $-191.59 B
April 2009 $266.21 B $287.11 B $-20.91 B
May 2009 $117.22 B $306.87 B $-189.65 B
June 2009 $215.34 B $309.67 B $-94.33 B
July 2009 $151.48 B $332.16 B $-180.68 B
August 2009 $145.53 B $249.08 B $-103.56 B
September 2009 $218.88 B $264.09 B $-45.21 B
October 2009 $135.29 B $311.66 B $-176.36 B
November 2009 $133.56 B $253.85 B $-120.29 B
December 2009 $218.92 B $310.33 B $-91.41 B
January 2010 $205.24 B $247.87 B $-42.63 B
February 2010 $107.52 B $328.43 B $-220.91 B
March 2010 $153.36 B $218.75 B $-65.39 B
April 2010 $245.26 B $327.95 B $-82.69 B
May 2010 $146.79 B $282.72 B $-135.93 B
June 2010 $251.05 B $319.47 B $-68.42 B
July 2010 $155.55 B $320.59 B $-165.04 B
August 2010 $164 B $254.52 B $-90.53 B
September 2010 $245.21 B $279.81 B $-34.61 B
October 2010 $145.95 B $286.38 B $-140.43 B
November 2010 $148.97 B $299.36 B $-150.39 B
December 2010 $236.88 B $315.01 B $-78.13 B
January 2011 $226.55 B $276.35 B $-49.8 B
February 2011 $110.66 B $333.16 B $-222.51 B
March 2011 $150.89 B $339.05 B $-188.15 B
April 2011 $289.54 B $329.93 B $-40.39 B
May 2011 $174.94 B $232.58 B $-57.64 B
June 2011 $249.66 B $292.74 B $-43.08 B
July 2011 $159.06 B $288.44 B $-129.38 B
August 2011 $169.25 B $303.39 B $-134.14 B
September 2011 $240.15 B $302.9 B $-62.75 B
October 2011 $163.07 B $261.54 B $-98.47 B
November 2011 $152.4 B $289.7 B $-137.3 B
December 2011 $239.96 B $325.93 B $-85.97 B
January 2012 $234.32 B $261.73 B $-27.41 B
February 2012 $103.41 B $335.1 B $-231.68 B
March 2012 $171.22 B $369.37 B $-198.16 B
April 2012 $318.81 B $259.69 B $59.12 B
May 2012 $180.71 B $305.35 B $-124.64 B
June 2012 $260.18 B $319.92 B $-59.74 B
July 2012 $184.59 B $254.19 B $-69.6 B
August 2012 $178.86 B $369.39 B $-190.53 B
September 2012 $261.57 B $186.39 B $75.18 B
October 2012 $184.32 B $304.31 B $-120 B
November 2012 $161.73 B $333.84 B $-172.11 B
December 2012 $269.51 B $270.7 B $-1.19 B
January 2013 $272.23 B $269.34 B $2.88 B
February 2013 $122.82 B $326.35 B $-203.54 B
March 2013 $186.02 B $292.55 B $-106.53 B
April 2013 $406.72 B $293.83 B $112.89 B
May 2013 $197.18 B $335.91 B $-138.73 B
June 2013 $286.63 B $170.13 B $116.5 B
July 2013 $200.03 B $297.62 B $-97.59 B

1789 to 1900 (Nominal Dollars)

1789 to 1849: Cumulative Surplus of $70 million dollars

1850 to 1900: Cumulative Deficit of $991 million dollars

1901 to 1939 (Nominal Dollars)

Year – Nominal Dollars – Surplus/Deficit

1901 – 63 million

1902 – 77 million

1903 – 45 million

1904 – 43 million

1905 – 23 million

1906 – 25 million

1907 – 87 million

1908 – 57 million

1909 – 89 million

1910 – 18 million

1911 – 11 million

1912 – 3 million

1913 – Breakeven

1914 – Breakeven

1915 – 63 million

1916 – 48 million

1917 – 853 million

1918 – 9.03 billion

1919 – 13.36 billion

1920 – 291 million

1921 – 509 million

1922 – 736 million

1923 – 713 million

1924 – 963 million

1925 – 717 million

1926 – 865 million

1927 – 1.15 billion

1928 – 939 million

1929 – 734 million

1930 – 738 million

1931 – 462 million

1932 – 2.76 billion

1933 – 2.6 billion

1934 – 3.59 billion

1935 – 2.8 billion

1936 – 4.3 billion

1937 – 2.2 billion

1938 – 89 million

1939 – 2.85 billion

Major Events from 1940 to 2012

Great Depression – 1929 to 1938
WWII – 1939 to 1945
Korean War – 1950 to 1953
Vietnam War – 1955 to 1975 (US combat units deployed in 1965)
Oil Embargo – 1973
Soviet Union Collapses – 1991
Gulf War – 1990-1991
9/11 – September 11th, 2001
Iraq War – 2003 to 2011
Global Financial Meltdown – 2007 to ?

In the last 69 years, the U.S. government has managed to post 12 surpluses, with the most recent coming in 2001.

The largest uninterrupted stretch of surpluses came between 1920 and 1930. This eventually came to an end after the government spent billions of dollars combating the Great Depression.

The largest uninterrupted stretch of deficits came between 1970 and 1997.

It’s hard to imagine that the United States will post a surplus anytime soon – will we give the 28 year stretch between 1970 and 1997 a run for its money?

By: 

Compartmentalizing The Christian Walk Part 4


Today we stand in need of another reformation, for the bride is once again a silenced minority. The bride is being disrespected, insulted and discredited by the world at the hands of the establish church and governments.

      The Catholic Church continues to be the largest church in the world. The protestant church, in a way, has become a part of the establish church, at least here in America.

      The prosperity gospel, the materialism, the all about me gospel, the give me, give me gospel and the gospel that rejects the fact the God’s people must change, has indeed taken over.

      Through history God has used revivals to reveal to us what was needed in a particular time in history.

      The emphasis of The First Great awakening of the 1730s and 1740 can be seen in the following quote:

“In all these Protestant cultures during the middle decades of the eighteenth century, a new Age of Faith rose to counter the currents of the Age of Enlightenment, to reaffirm the view that being truly religious meant trusting the heart rather than the head, prizing feeling more than thinking, and relying on biblical revelation rather than human reason.”

 

         This First Awakening was for the church; it was a massive assault against the established church. It was the contrary of what was acceptable by the prestige and by the powerful. Baptists and Methodist led this revival.

      The Second Great Awakening stated in 1790 and extended all the way to the early 1900s. This was a revival of new souls; it was what was needed at the time.

      The Third Great Awakening started in the 1850 and also extended trough the 1900s. This was the beginning of the Social Gospel. This revival confronted and fought for the abolition of slavery, but also placed a great emphasis on holiness. So this third revival was not only designed to affect the world, but also the character of the church. The Methodist led the way in the doctrine of sanctification.

      The Azusa Street Revival gave us a sense of our need for God’s Spirit. This revival re-introduced something that seemed to have been taken away from the pages of the Bible, the Baptism of the Holy Spirit. This time God used a black man by the name of William J. Seymour, son of slaves, to lead the way of this great revolution. This was the start of the Pentecostal denomination.

      So through these four revivals God gave us the true Gospel of Salvation through Jesus. Everything starts there. Without salvation we have nothing. Through these four revivals we saw a massive evangelism as new souls were added to the Kingdom. We also saw God’s desire to affect the world. Through these four revivals we saw sanctification become centered in the Christian life. We also saw God establishing our need for His Spirit to be able to accomplished what we are called to carry out.

 

      So what about today? Today we stand in need of another revival. This time God is bringing all the four great revivals of the past in one. As we make Jesus our Savior and our Lord, walking in the Spirit will become the center of our live. Bearing the fruit of the Spirit is what will indeed make us the light and the salt of the world, as we become one bride.

      If I have to give a name to the revival that is coming I would call it a Revival of Unity and Holiness. It will be one that will also be for the church, but it will also bring millions into the kingdom. The world will see a church where brothers and sisters from different nationalities and denominations will come together as a true family.

      The church will indeed be a church that will embrace holiness and will stop using our imperfections as an excuse to pursue surrendering to sin. This will be a revival where people will study the Scriptures and measure everything by the Word.

      I see a church that is alive, I see a church that is prophetic, I see a church that is powerful, I see a church with amazing music that the world will envy. I hear new songs, new sounds and new rhythms. I see a talented church, but not just talented, but also filled with character and the anointing of God. I see these things and more, for those are the things that will be needed for that crucial hour.

      We must understand that the establishment, in everything, functions through powerful networks. However, we the church, function through God’s Spirit manifested in God’s most dangerous tool against the world’s system, revival.