GDP & Unemployment Rate “Looking at the Numbers that Count”


People have their strong opinions regarding who they consider a good or bad president. Some say that Obama was one of the best presidents in the history of the universe. Others consider him a total failure. George W. Bush seems to inspire a lot of hate back during his time serving as Commander and Chief. Others have nothing but good things to say about him.

         I have never had the privilege of meeting any president personally so I can’t judge their hearts, their goodness or evil intentions. What I can say is that a President is not a religious leader; he is a political leader and a commander… period! I am making an effort to focus on the numbers that count; that is, the size of the economy, job creation and an objective look at our budget as a nation (debt and surplus).Today, in our series dealing with the numbers that count, we are taking a look at the GDP and the unemployment rate.

         When we talk about unemployment we speak about the heart of America. To be unemployed and unproductive is bad for every human being. God designed us with the ability to make our own living and to work. The dignity of having a job is fundamental for our families and our society in general. So lets talk about jobs. Let me start by saying that, as you can see in the chart below, no other President has created more jobs, per month, than President Clinton.[1] Not much explanation is needed; these numbers are speaking loud and clear.

Job Growth

         Before we continue, lets also take a look at the best GDP (Gross Domestic Products) average. The GDP is essential when speaking about the economy and jobs; that is because the GDP is essentially the level of our ability to buy and sell; it is what moves the economy. According the US Bureau of Economic Analysis (BEA):

“GDP is one of the most comprehensive and closely watched economic statistics: It is used by the White House and Congress to prepare the Federal budget, by the Federal Reserve to formulate monetary policy, by Wall Street as an indicator of economic activity, and by the business community to prepare forecasts of economic performance that provide the basis for production, investment, and employment planning.”[2]

            There is no way around these numbers; they are easy to find and they are a reflection of every presidency. Policies will affect the economy and the ability to create jobs. “Under President Trump the US GDP has grown by more than $300 billion in just two quarters”.[3]

Economy growth

       There are some interesting numbers to look at in terms of unemployment. President Johnson had the lowest average unemployment rate across his presidency since 1948 at 4.2 percent. So far President Ford saw the highest average unemployment rate at over 7.8 percent, followed closely by President Reagan at over 7.5 percent. President Obama’s presidency saw an unemployment rate of 7.2 percent. His last year in the White House was his best with an average unemployment rate of 4.7 percent. So far under Trump, from January to July of this year, the average unemployment rate is 4.4 percent.[4]

         So, in the mix of all the turmoil, the people resigning and getting fired, the attacks, the back and forth between the president and the press, the protest and the accusations, etc. as we glance at the numbers that count, Trump economy and job reports are heading in the right direction. Love or hate, this is not my opinion these are real numbers.

 

References:

[1] https://www.usnews.com/news/blogs/data-mine/2015/10/28/which-presidents-have-been-best-for-the-economy

[2] http://www.thegatewaypundit.com/2017/07/under-president-trump-the-us-gdp-surpasses-19-trillion-for-the-first-time-ever/

[3] http://www.thegatewaypundit.com/2017/07/under-president-trump-the-us-gdp-surpasses-19-trillion-for-the-first-time-ever/

[4] http://historyinpieces.com/research/us-unemployment-rates-president

 

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